Start Glossary Url

Watching Changes

(Ooriginal Page= http://www.wikidot.com/faq:watching )

Email notifications are still being discussed.

Please contribute to the discussion if you would like to share your thoughts.

Table of Contents

What is the new watching feature?

The "watching" feature allows you to follow changes on a site, page or category. One of the methods of receiving the notifications is by email, directly into your inbox. Other delivery channels, e.g. RSS, is on its way too.

Why?

Delivering event notifications by email has tremendous positive impact on both large communities and small teams. It helps keeping people aware of what is going on, makes the collaboration more efficient (because you do not need to exchange emails saying "Look, I have edited this page") and keeps communities more organized.

What happened to the old "watched pages" options?

It will be removed in the near future, since it was a half-baked solution and somehow counter-intuitive.

What can be watched?

You can watch whole sites, whole categories within a site or individual pages. If you are watching the whole site, you will be notified about changes from all pages. The same goes for category and its pages.

If you are watching a page, we will notify you whenever someone alters a page or adds a comment to it.

How do I start watching?

There are 2 ways of starting watching:

  • Automatically, once you:
    • create a new site, you are automatically watching the site
    • edit or comment on a page, you can start watching it
  • Manually
    • Using the "start watching" in the bottom page options section.

Automatic watching can be enabled/disabled in the Account Settings / Watching.

Why am I suddenly watching dozens of sites and pages?

To give this new feature proper launch all our users have been automatically subscribed to sites and pages based on the following rules:

  • if you are a member of a site, you watch it (including all the page and forum changes)
  • if you are an admin (or creator) of a site, you watch it (including all the page and forum changes)
  • if you have edited or commented a page on a site you are not member of, you watch it.

How do I keep those emails organized in my mailbox?

If you are getting more than a few notifications per day you might want to put all of them into a separate folder. If your email service (or email software) supports filters, you can easily create one. All event emails are sent from watching@wikidot.com address, so you can use it as the only and sufficient criteria.

How do I unwatch?

Every notification email has a unique link. Once followed it allows to unsubscribe from a given kind (source) of events or stop all email notifications.

You can also configure your list of watched items in your Account Settings / Watching
Tags:


Welcome!
[[include include:languages pagename=start]]

Welcome to the Wikidot handbook. This is a community edited website and any member of wikidot can contribute.

If you wonder where to contribute look on the table below. There are the main sections to look at or a whole site map on the left menu if you want an overview. But please have a look on the Conventions for translations page which collects the conventions used and the Magic Language Navigation and the new page which explains the technical methods.
There is also a wonderfull explanation of the used technic for multi-lingual sites on the Multi-lingual wiki !

The Content of this handbook is split in different sections, representing the experience we have gained when we were beginners about essential knowledge of wikidot and how to use it the best way we know how. We've tried to order the steps so that they represent an easy learning curve.

In the future, the menu on the left side will show the "headings" of the sections as a starting page with an overview.

Please feel free to contribute if you think you can help!

Wikidot for beginners Editing for beginners Site creation for beginners
What Is A Wiki Site?
Introduction
Terms Of Service (Legal issues)
What Is A License?
Find A Page
Create an account
Login At Wikidot
Logout From Wikidot
Private messaging
My Account
Join a Wiki
Search engine
How To Edit Pages
Edit A Page
Page Option Buttons
Forum Option Buttons
Start a New Page
Page Title - How to edit?
Link to a Wiki Page
Introduction To Images
Upload an Image
Editing FAQ
Colored Text
Wiki Syntax
First forum posts
First forum threads
Start A Wiki
First Steps On A New Wiki
Site Manager (Menu)
Public Or Private
Naming (URL)
Title (not the URL!)
Permissions for visitors
Forum step by step
Forum emergency
Menu structure (nav:)
Inviting Members, E-mail
Advanced Wikidot usage Advanced editing Advanced site management
Templates
Autonumbering of pages
Watching changes
Data forms
Browser requirements
Embedding other services
Searching
Site structure
Users
Layout reference
Thumbnails
Video Tutorials
Advertising
Adsense
Wikidot API
Introduction to Divs
Info Box
Center an Image in a Div
multi-colums
Problems with Divs
table-layout
Keyboard Shortcuts
Modules
Sophisticated technic (includes)
Divs, Span
embellish text
File upload, download
Inline styling
Categories designed
Private categories
Page Tags
Special List of pages
Backup done - save it
Mass Delete Tool
Delete A Wiki
Restore A Wiki
Statcounter
Google Analytics
Add a StumbleUpon link
User and community control Content control Promotion of Handbook site
Block Anonymous/Members
CSS - Themes
RSS & Feeders
get moderator
get invited to be admin
Spam in Forum & Pages - what to do
means: I have no idea where
to put these issues
"Content" page ( with such structure)
Compare to other languages
Site Structure comparison
Known Issues
Snippets
How-Tos where they belongs to..
adsense API
Glossary
Index(en) (new!)
content is all about the handbook technic,
the multilingual layout like:
Conventions for translations
Add Another Language
Magic Language Navigation

compare-to-other-languages


site-structure-comparison


Last 5 Edited

The ListPages module does not work recursively.

Last 5 New

The ListPages module does not work recursively.

Tags:


What Is A License ?
[[include include:languages pagename=what-is-a-license]]

This article is meant as a general introduction to licenses. As the specific laws will vary from place to place and given the fact that the author is not a lawyer, please do not consider this legal advice.
Thanks to hartnell for his words here, the founder of Game Design Novice - a typical Wikidot Site created from him with the free Wikidot software - it is Open Source!

What is a License?

In amateur game programming and design you hear about licenses all the time, especially when games and resources are distributed across the internet. In fact, even the text of and resources provided by Game Design Novice, are available under the terms of a license. What are these things, that we call licenses? What use are they? Do you really need one? This article will answer those questions.

Copyright

Before there can be a license, there must be copyright. Someone must own the rights to something. This is very important. Because if someone doesn't own the copyright, the material in question is public domain and therefore no license is needed.

Copyright, of course, is the legal right to control your work. Many people believe that copyright is the right to "profit" from your work. While this is certainly part of it, you can't profit from your work if you cannot control it. If anyone, anywhere, at anytime can copy your work, there is no reason for anyone to pay for it, they can just copy it.

Therefore, copyright gives you the legal right to determine who can and cannot make copies of your work.

The End User License

Whenever you buy and install software, you agree to what is commonly titled "The End User License". When you buy Adobe Photoshop or any other commercial software, you do not actually own the software. You do, however, own the CD that it came on. However, the program itself still belongs to the company who owns the copyright. The End User License gives you permission to use that software under certain conditions, assuming that you have paid for the permission to use it. The most common conditions of use under an End User License are:

  • That you only use the software on one computer. After all, that's all you've paid to get permission for.
  • That you do not make copies of it.
  • That you do not hold the company responsible for any damages the software does.

The Group License

With an End User License it is assumed that one person has paid for permission to make one copy of the software. This copy is not necessarily a back-up copy and such laws are not discussed in this article. Instead, you must realize that when you install the software, you are making a copy of it. The copy is from CD to your computer.

The Group License is an option with many software packages and helps us illustrate the "permission" aspect of licenses. A group license grants further permission for the software to be copied on more than one computer. Often the limit is based on a finite limit (say 5) of computers, or all of the computers at a location (at one school). Naturally, since you are buying more instances of permission with a Group License, it costs quite a bit more.

Copyleft

The above two sections describe how a copyright holder sells permission to people who want to use their work. The permission, and the terms for gaining that permission, are encompassed in the license. But what if someone wants to retain copyright over a work and doesn't want money for someone to use it? What if they do not even care if someone asks for permission in the traditional sense (buying a product, or a friendly email)? Enter Copyleft.

A copyleft license such as a Creative Commons license or a GNU license gives permission for someone to use a copyrighted work under simple and easy to understand conditions without the exchange of money. For example, Game Design Novice is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License. Under this license, you are allowed to use anything you see here (unless stated otherwise) for any reason as long as you follow one condition: you attribute the work to "The Game Designers of Game Design Novice" and link to the page you got it from.

In short, since money is not involved, and work is used more or less freely, Creative Commons and GNU licenses are a way for an author to get credit. In fact, if someone decides to use your work without following your conditions, there's nothing you can do about it without spending a large amount of money on lawyers. Here, in the Copyleft world, we tend to work on an honor system.

How to set and choose the license for your wiki

Go to your site manager yoursite.wikidot.com/admin:manage.
You can set different licenses for different categories of pages.

You will get a page with following content:

It is very important to clarify the copyright and ownership issues for your site. We highly recommend setting an open "copyleft" license that allows making the Content more or less free to copy, modify and use.

This is particularly important when your Site is created and edited collaboratively.

Read more about Creative Commons licenses, use a wizard to select the proper license or just visit Creative Commons.

Choose the category (typical example list here):

  • _default
  • admin
  • css
  • forum
  • nav
  • system

or set Inherit from "_default" for the others..

Choose the license:
( see list next paragraph)

Licenses supported

(copied from Site manager)

  • Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License (recommended)
  • Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives 2.5
  • GNU Free Documentation License 1.2
  • Standard copyright (not recommended)
  • Other: Custom license text: (max 300 characters ) - A few HTML tags are allowed: <a>, <img/>, <br/>, <strong>, <em>

Wikidot Terms of Service

Licences are part of Wikidot Terms of Service (TOS)
which can be read at http://www.wikidot.com/legal:terms-of-service

Conclusion

And there you have it, the bare minimum you need to know about licenses.
You will find the chosen license on a wikidot.com site as the last line at the bottom of any page! Have a look and you will find here:

"Unless stated otherwise Content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License"

ToDo

Adapt the text specifically to wiki edition …
gerdamigerdami
Tags: license to_be_revised tos


What Is A Wiki Site
[[include include:languages pagename=what-is-a-wiki-site]]

According to Wikipedia, the world's largest wiki site:

A Wiki ([ˈwiː.kiː] <wee-kee> or [ˈwɪ.kiː] <wick-ey>) is a type of website that allows users to add, remove, or otherwise edit and change most content very quickly and easily.

And that is it! As a part of Wikidot.com network this site is a customizable piece of the Internet where users can edit content, upload files, communicate and collaborate.

The following article was copied from the community site:
http://community.wikidot.com/what-is-a-wiki-site

Traditional static websites often do not allow you to do much more than to read the content, contribute to a forum, email comments to the site owner or buy things.

But a wiki is different; it is a type of website that allows some or all visitors to the site to add, remove and change pages and content very quickly and easily.

Wikis Reduce E-mail. The ability of groups to collectively edit and develop documents can save hundreds of back-and-forth emails as shown in the image below:

wiki_collaboration.jpg
This wiki/email comparison image was originally produced by Manny Wilson in June 2007 for a presentation to senior leadership at the United States Central Command to demonstrate how wikis could be used to more rapidly draft contingency plans.

One advantage of a wiki over a traditional website is that the responsibility for making changes doesn't rest with just one person, it becomes a group resource and everyone has a stake in it and a contribution to make. Making changes and adding content can become quite addictive and good fun.

Where did wikis come from?

The name "Wiki" was inspired by the Hawaiian word wiki or wiki-wiki, which means "quick". The first wiki was developed in 1995 by an American, Ward Cunningham, who wanted an alternative to the word "quick" for his product that would allow quick, collaborative editing. He remembered the wiki-wiki shuttle buses that run between terminals at Honolulu International Airport and the name stuck.

Who uses wikis?

Wikis are now used extensively in education for classwork, assignments, and projects. Many community groups also use wikis to enable local residents to promote their town or village as a group without one person always having the responsibility of keeping it up to date.

In business, wikis are now used by many of the world's most innovative companies for team collaboration, co-authoring of documents (it avoids long email chains and makes collaboration much easier), knowledge management and intranets, event planning, contact with customers and for project work.

What are wikis used for?

Some uses that we have seen are shown below:

  • to co-author documents
  • to draft and maintain manuals
  • as a knowledge base
  • to develop an intranet or extranet
  • to communicate initiatives
  • to display static or dynamic information
  • to display frequently-asked-questions (FAQs)
  • to facilitate online discussions of topics
  • to gather requirements
  • to store college notes
  • to gather sources of information in one place accessible from anywhere
  • for team communication
  • to log client work
  • to log clients and contacts
  • to log bugs in software development
  • to organize and manage projects
  • to organize events
  • to publish articles
  • to publish checklists
  • to publish reference documentation
  • to record meeting notes
  • to record team or organization goals
  • to solve problems remotely
  • to track deadlines
  • to track invoices
  • for brainstorming and mindmapping
  • to create to-do lists
  • for conversation logs
  • for record-keeping
  • for diaries
  • to create research notes
  • to plan and write novels
  • …and lots more

Authors

This article was copied from the community site:
http://community.wikidot.com/what-is-a-wiki-site
and created by RobElliottRobElliott - thanks to him!
Tags:


WhoInvited Module
||included (not copied! from original-doc http://www.wikidot.com/doc:whoinvited-module ||

Tags:


Wiki Syntax
[[include include:languages pagename=wiki-syntax]]

Copied (not included !) from http://www.wikidot.com/doc:wiki-syntax - this is the same page You open if You edit a page and click at the button under the "Edit window":
"Need help? Check the wiki syntax description and code snippets collection."

Helpful is: [http://doc.wikidot.com/] (build by Community-Admins ) with the translate-button right side!


This document describes the Wiki Syntax used within the Wikidot.com project.

Any page of any of the sites exists in two different forms: the source code and the compiled code. Source code is what you can edit and what describes the content of the page. Source code is compiled into the (XHTML) code that is sent to the browser when you view/browse the page. The Wiki Syntax is used to create content of the pages by editing the source code.

If you are looking for wiki code snippets ready to copy/paste/modify, please visit our Code Snippets Site.

Table of Contents

Inline Formatting

what you type what you get
//italic text// italic text
**bold text** bold text
//**italic and bold**// italic and bold
__underline text__ underline text
--strikethrough text-- strikethrough text
{{teletype (monospaced) text}} teletype (monospaced) text
normal^^superscript^^ normalsuperscript
normal,,subscript,, normalsubscript
[!-- invisible comment --]
[[span style="color:red"]]custom //span// element[[/span]] custom span element
##blue|predefined## or ##44FF88|custom-code## color predefined or custom-code color

Text Size

what you type what you get
[[size 80%]]80% of Normal Size[[/size]] 80% of Normal Size
[[size 100%]]100% of Normal Size[[/size]] 100% of Normal Size
[[size 200%]]200% of Normal Size[[/size]] 200% of Normal Size
[[size xx-small]]xx-small text[[/size]] xx-small text
[[size x-small]]x-small text[[/size]] x-small text
[[size small]]small text[[/size]] small text
[[size smaller]]smaller text[[/size]] smaller text
Normal text Normal text
[[size larger]]larger text[[/size]] larger text
[[size large]]large text[[/size]] large text
[[size x-large]]x-large text[[/size]] x-large text
[[size xx-large]]xx-large text[[/size]] xx-large text

Paragraphs and newlines

Paragraphs are separated by two new lines. One new line produces a… new line.

First paragraph. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. 

Second paragraph. Aenean a libero. Vestibulum adipiscing, felis ac faucibus imperdiet, erat lacus accumsan neque, vitae nonummy lorem pede ac elit.
Just a new line.
Another new line.

First paragraph. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit.

Second paragraph. Aenean a libero. Vestibulum adipiscing, felis ac faucibus imperdiet, erat lacus accumsan neque, vitae nonummy lorem pede ac elit.
Just a new line.
Another new line.

Typography

If you do care about typography there are a few ways to improve it in your text:

you type you get
``quotation'' “quotation”
`quotation' ‘quotation’
,,quotation'' „quotation”
dots... dots…
em -- dash em — dash

Literal Text

If you want to escape parsing and produce raw text enclose it in double @@ characters.

This //text// gets **parsed**. 

@@This //text// does not get **parsed**.@@

This text gets parsed.

This //text// does not get **parsed**.

Comments

A comment is a source block that is not rendered in the compiled version. To add a comment to the source use [!-- ... --] construct, e.g.:

[!--
This text will not be rendered.
--]

Headings

To make a heading start a line with a "plus". Make as many pluses as the heading level you want to get.

+ Level 1 Heading
++ Level 2 Heading
+++ Level 3 Heading
++++ Level 4 Heading
+++++ Level 5 Heading
++++++ Level 6 Heading

Table of Contents

To create a list of every heading, with a link to that heading, put a table of contents tag on its own line.

[[toc]]
[[f>toc]] - right-float table of contents
[[f<toc]] - left-float table of contents

Horizontal Rules

Use four dashes or more (----) to create a horizontal rule.

Lists

Bulleted Lists

Make a list element by starting a line with an asterisk. To increase indent put extra spaces
before the asterisk.

* Bullet 1
* Bullet 2
 * Bullet 2.1
  • Bullet 1
  • Bullet 2
    • Bullet 2.1

Numbered Lists

Similarly, you can create numbered lists by starting a paragraph with one or more hashes.

# Item 1
# Item 2
 # Item 2.1
  1. Item 1
  2. Item 2
    1. Item 2.1

You can mix bulleted lists and number lists.

Definition Lists

You can create a definition (description) list with the following syntax:

: Item 1 : Something
: Item 2 : Something else
Item 1
Something
Item 2
Something else

Block Quotes

You can mark a blockquote by starting a line with one or more '>' characters, followed by a space and the text to be quoted.

This is normal text here.

> Indent me! The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. \
Now this the time for all good men to come to the aid of \
their country. Notice how we can continue the block-quote \
in the same "paragraph" by using a backslash at the end of \
the line.
>
> Another block, leading to...
>> Second level of indenting. This second is indented even \
more than the previous one.

Back to normal text.

This is normal text here.

Indent me! The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. Now this the time for all good men to come to the aid of their country. Notice how we can continue the block-quote in the same "paragraph" by using a backslash at the end of the line.
Another block, leading to…

Second level of indenting. This second is indented even more than the previous one.

Back to normal text.

Links

Internal links

Unlike some other wiki engines wikibox.net does not process SqusherAndCapitalized or CamelCase words as page links. Instead any link should be marked with 3 nesting square brackets.

If a page address contains disallowed characters the address will be "unixified" to contain only allowed chars. The displayed name however will maintain original form.

what you type what you get comments
[[[link-to-a-page]]] link-to-a-page using raw page name
[[[link "TO" ą pagE]]] link "TO" ą pagE automatic purification of destination page
[[[category: sample page]]] sample page linked to a page with category
[[[some page| custom text]]] custom text using custom text
[[[doc|Documentation]]] Documentation linking to an existing page (different color)
[[[doc#toc1|Section 1]]] Section 1 linking to an anchor (first section)
[[[doc#toc1]]] doc linking to an anchor (first section)

URLs

what you type what you get comments
http://www.wikidot.com http://www.wikidot.com simple inline link
[http://www.wikidot.com wikidot] wikidot named link (custom anchor)
*http://www.wikidot.com
[*http://www.wikidot.com wikidot]
http://www.wikidot.com
wikidot
opens in a new window
[# empty link] empty link link with href="javascript:;" i.e. not leading anywhere. usefull when constructing pull-down menus

Anchors

To place an anchor use [[# anchor-name]] syntax. To refer to an anchor (and scroll to it) use [#anochor-name text to display].

Emails

what you type what you get comments
support@example.com moc.elpmaxe|troppus#moc.elpmaxe|troppus simple inline email
[support@example.com email me!] moc.elpmaxe|troppus#!em liame custom anchor

Although we discourage anyone from putting his/her email address on the web, WikiDot engine provides a simple scrambling mechanism to prevent automated bots from reading emails. Each email is scrambled and it is decoded in the client's browser. So it is not 100% spam-safe, but much safer than plain-text emails.

InterWiki

To link directly to a Wikipedia article you can use a syntax:

what you type what you get
[wikipedia:Albert_Einstein] Albert_Einstein
[wikipedia:Albert_Einstein Albert] Albert

Other links defined by example:

  • [google:free+wiki] - search google for the "free wiki" term
  • [dictionary:wiki] - look up definitions of the word wiki from dictionary.reference.com

Images

Single images

To insert an image into the page use the following syntax:

[[image image-source attribute1="value1" attribute2="value2" ...]]

And here is the list of allowed attributes:

attribute name allowed values example value description
link wiki page name or URL "wiki-page"
"http://www.example.com"
makes image a link to another page or web address; this is ignored when using Flickr as a source; prepend the link with '*' to make it open in a new window
alt any string "a photo of me" text substitution when image not available
width number of pixels "200px" forces width of a image when displaying
height number of pixels "200px" forces height of a image when displaying
style valid CSS style definition "border: 1px solid red; padding: 2em;" adds extra CSS style to the image
class CSS class "mystyle" forces the image CSS class - suggested use only with customized themes
size "square" - 75x75 pixels
"thumbnail" - 100 on longest side
"small" - 240 on longest side
"medium" - 500 on longest side
"large" - 1024 on longest side (only for Flickr large images)
"original" - original image (Flickr only)
any of allowed ;-) displays a resized image; great for thumbnails
if flickr is the source it pulls required size from a Flickr server;
this option has effect only on local images or Flickr images

size attribute works very well with local files (attached to pages) not only with image files, but with e.g. PDF or PostScript. See this page for more details.

The image-source can be one of the following:

source type format example value description
URL address any valid URL address http://www.example.com/image.jpg displays image from the web address
file attachment (current page) filename exampleimage.jpg displays image attached to the current page
file attachement (different page) /another-page-name/filename /another-page/exampleimage.jpg displays image attached to a different page
flickr image flickr:photoid flickr:83001279 displays image from Flickr and links to the original Flickr page
flickr image (private) flickr:photoid_secret flickr:149666562_debab08866 displays image from Flickr and links to the original Flickr page; if the secret is provided the image is available despite being marked as non-public

To make the linked document in a new window you can either prepend the link attribute with '*' (e.g. link="*http://www.example.com" or prepend the src element with '*' (e.g. *flickr:149666562_debab08866, *image-file etc.) for images that automatically generate links.

To choose horizontal alignment use:

  • [[=image… - centered image
  • [[<image… - image on left
  • [[>image… - image on right
  • [[f<image… - image on left floating (surrounded by text)
  • [[f>image… - image on right floating (surrounded by text)

Gallery of images

To insert a series of images into a page content use the [[gallery]] element:

[[gallery size="image-size"]]

or
[[gallery size="image-size"]]
: image-source1 attribute1="value1" attribute2="value2" ...
: image-source2 attribute1="value1" attribute2="value2" ...
...
[[/gallery]]

The only allowed attribute within the [[gallery]] tag is size with allowed values: "square", "thumbnail", "small", "medium".

If the [[gallery]] tag is invoked without a list of images it automatically displays rescaled images (thumbnails) of imageable files attached to the current page (this also include thumbnails for any .pdf or .ps document).

If [[gallery]] is invoked with a list of images, only these images are displayed. image-source must not be a URL in this case. Allowed "per-image attributes are:

  • link - URL or wiki page name (does not work with Flickr images to be o.k. with Flickr terms)
  • alt - alternative text when the image is not available

To make a document open in a new window the same rules as with a single image applies.

Also see FlickrGallery module if you wish to import images from Flickr.

Code Blocks

Create code blocks by using [[code]]…[[/code]] tags (each on its own line).

This is an example code block!

To create PHP blocks that get automatically colorized when you use PHP tags, simply surround the code with [[code type="php"]]…[[/code]] tags).

To get PHP code colorized you should surround it with <?php.. ?>.

WikiDot.com uses PEAR::Text_Highlighter and supports a number of color schemes. Here is what is supported (allowed type values):

php, html, cpp, css, diff, dtd, java, javascript, perl, python, ruby, xml.

[[code type="php"]]
<?php
/* comment */
for($i=0; $i<100; $i++){
echo "number".$i."\n";
}
?>
[[/code]]
<?php
/* comment */
for($i=0; $i<100; $i++){
echo "number".$i."\n";
}
?>

Tables

Simple tables

You can create simple tables using pairs of vertical bars:

||~ head 1 ||~ head 2 ||~ head 3 ||
|| cell 1 || cell 2 || cell 3 ||
|||| long cell 4 || cell 5 ||
||cell 6 |||| long cell 7 ||
|||||| looong cell 8||
head 1 head 2 head 3
cell 1 cell 2 cell 3
long cell 4 cell 5
cell 6 long cell 7
looong cell 8
|| lines must start and end || with double vertical bars || nothing ||
|| cells are separated by || double vertical bars || nothing ||
|||| you can span multiple columns by || starting each cell ||
|| with extra cell |||| separators ||
|||||| but perhaps an example is _
the easiest way to see ||
lines must start and end with double vertical bars nothing
cells are separated by double vertical bars nothing
you can span multiple columns by starting each cell
with extra cell separators
but perhaps an example is
the easiest way to see

For a newline inside the table cell use _ (underscore) at the end of the line (see the example above).

Advanced (custom) tables

To create more advanced tables, special tags can be used that can accept class and style attributes for managing appearance. To create an advanced table use the following syntax:

[[table]]
[[row]]
[[cell style="border: 1px solid silver; background-color: yellow;"]]
call 0.0
[[/cell]]
[[cell style="border: 1px solid silver"]]
call 0.1
[[/cell]]
[[/row]]
[[row style="border: 1px solid silver"]]
[[cell]]
call 1.0
[[/cell]]
[[cell style="border: 1px solid silver; background-color: yellow;"]]
call 1.1
[[/cell]]
[[/row]]
[[/table]]
transforms to…
cell 0.0 cell 0.1
cell 1.0 cell 1.1

Each of elements [[table]], [[row]] and [[cell]] can accept attributes style and class and they are transformed to (X)HTML tags: <table>, <tr> and <td>.

An example of using tables for page layout can be found on our Snippets Wiki at: http://snippets.wikidot.com/code:layout-with-tables .

Tables can be nested.

Block formatting elements

Left, right, centered and justified

To apply horizontal alignment to a block of text use:

[[<]] ... [[/<]] align left
[[>]] ... [[/>]] align right
[[=]] ... [[/=]] align center
[[==]] ... [[/==]] align justified

E.g.

[[=]]
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit.\
Aenean a libero. Vestibulum adipiscing, felis ac faucibus \
imperdiet, erat lacus accumsan neque, vitae nonummy lorem \
pede ac elit. 

Maecenas in urna. Curabitur hendrerit risus vitae ligula.
[[/=]]

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean a libero. Vestibulum adipiscing, felis ac faucibus imperdiet, erat lacus accumsan neque, vitae nonummy lorem pede ac elit.

Maecenas in urna. Curabitur hendrerit risus vitae ligula.

To center a single line use = at the beginning:

= Centered line

Centered line

Custom div blocks

To improve the layout you can use [[div]] ... [[/div]] elements which transform to html @div> ... </div@ blocks.
Allowed attributes are: class and style only but this should be more than enough to create desired layout.

[[div]] blocks can be nested.

Below is an example how to create a 2-column layout using div block:

[[div style="float:left; width: 45%; padding: 0 2%"]]
left column left column left column left column left column
left column left column left column left column left column
[[/div]]
[[div style="float:left; width: 45%; padding: 0 2%"]]
right column right column right column right column right column
right column right column right column right column right column
[[/div]]

~~~~~

left column left column left column left column left column left column left column left column left column left column

right column right column right column right column right column right column right column right column right column right column

The ~~~~ element is used to clear floats and translates more or less to <div style="clear:both"></div>).

Custom [[div]] blocks can be used to create very advanced page layouts.

Math

WikiDot.com uses LaTeX to render beautiful equations. For these who know LaTeX syntax using wikidot equations should be quite obvious. Please

Equations

Simply put the equation between [[math label]] … [[/math]] block tags (the label is optional). The equation is rendered within LaTex \begin{equation} ... \end{equation} environment. Please refer to any LaTeX reference manual for details about syntax.

[[math label1]]
\rho _{\rm GJ} = -\sigma (r) \left[ (1 - \eta _{\ast }^2 {\kappa \over {\eta ^3}}) \cos \chi \right.
+ \left. {3\over 2} \theta (\eta) H(\eta)
\xi \sin \chi \cos \phi \right]
[[/math]]
(1)
\begin{align} \rho _{\rm GJ} = -\sigma (r) \left[ (1 - \eta _{\ast }^2 {\kappa \over {\eta ^3}}) \cos \chi \right. + \left. {3\over 2} \theta (\eta) H(\eta) \xi \sin \chi \cos \phi \right] \end{align}

To refer to a labeled equation simply use [[eref label]] to get a raw number or e.g. Eq. ([[eref label1]]) which gives Eq. (1).

To break long equations use a type="eqnarray" attribute, e.g.

[[math label2 type="eqnarray"]]
\lefteqn{ \cos x = 1        
-\frac{x^{2}}{2!} +{} } \\
& & {}+\frac{x^{4}}{4!}
-\frac{x^{6}}{6!}+{}\cdots
[[/math]]
(2)
\begin{eqnarray} \lefteqn{ \cos x = 1 -\frac{x^{2}}{2!} +{} } \\ & & {}+\frac{x^{4}}{4!} -\frac{x^{6}}{6!}+{}\cdots \end{eqnarray}

Inline math

To use math expressions inside text (sentence) use [[$ ... $]] block tags.

[[$ E = mc^2 $]] is much more popular than 
[[$ G_{\mu\nu} - \Lambda g_{\mu\nu} = \kappa T_{\mu\nu} $]]

$E = mc^2$ is much more popular than $G_{\mu\nu} - \Lambda g_{\mu\nu} = \kappa T_{\mu\nu}$

Footnotes

To make footnotes in the text use [[footnote]] block. To force the list of footnotes
to appear not at the end of the page, use [[footnoteblock]].

Some text[[footnote]]And a small footnote.[[/footnote]]. Here we go 
with another footnote[[footnote]]Content of another footnote.[[/footnote]].

[[footnoteblock]]

Some text1. Here we go with another footnote2.

If you are not satisfied with the default title ("Footnotes") you can force your own title by using [[footnoteblock title="Custom title"]] or even do not use title at all (title="").

Bibliography

The bibliography block is defined by [[bibliography]]...[[/bibliography]]. Each bibliography item has the form:
label : full reference
To cite a bibliography entry use ((bibcite label)).

The first pulsar was observed by J. Bell and A. Hewish [((bibcite bell))]. Another reference [see ((bibcite guy))].

[[bibliography]]
: bell : Bell, J.; Hewish, A.; Pilkington, J. D. H.; Scott, P. F.; and Collins, R. A. //Observation of a Rapidly Pulsating Radio Source.// Nature 217, 709, 1968.
: guy : Guy, R. K. //Modular Difference Sets and Error Correcting Codes.// §C10 in Unsolved Problems in Number Theory, 2nd ed. New York: Springer-Verlag, pp. 118-121, 1994.
[[/bibliography]]

The first pulsar was observed by J. Bell and A. Hewish [1]. Another reference [see 2].

Bibliography
1. Bell, J.; Hewish, A.; Pilkington, J. D. H.; Scott, P. F.; and Collins, R. A. Observation of a Rapidly Pulsating Radio Source. Nature 217, 709, 1968.
2. Guy, R. K. Modular Difference Sets and Error Correcting Codes. §C10 in Unsolved Problems in Number Theory, 2nd ed. New York: Springer-Verlag, pp. 118-121, 1994.

If you are not satisfied with the default title ("Bibliography") you can force your own title by using [[bibliography title="Custom title"]] or even do not use title at all (title="").

Include other pages

If you want to include contents of another page use:

 [[include pagename]]

The include tag should start and end with a newline.

The [[include]] tag can also take parameters and substitute variables in the included source. To denote variables in the included page use:

{$var1}, {$number_books}, {$title}, {$variable_name}, {$variableName}

and in the including page use:

 [[include pagename var1=value1 | number_books = 43 | title=Best Wiki Ever 
| variable_name = just a variable
| variableName = another variable
]]

As you can see you can split variable definitions over several lines for cleaner code.

NOTE: includes and images/files: The [[include]] works just by inserting the page source at a given place. If you have any images or files attached in the included page and you refer to them as [[image filename.jpg]] in the included page, please rather use the image/file source with the name of the page too, e.g. [[image included-page/filename.jpg]]

Embedding media

Video

To embed video directly into the page use [[embedvideo]] ... [[/embedvideo]] block.
Between the the "embedding html code" should be placed from any of the following video online galleries:

E.g.

[[embedvideo]]
<embed style="width:400px; height:326px;" id="VideoPlayback" align="middle"
type="application/x-shockwave-flash"
src="http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docId=263244138622602613"
allowScriptAccess="sameDomain" quality="best" bgcolor="#ffffff" scale="noScale" salign="TL" 
FlashVars="playerMode=embedded"> </embed>
[[/embedvideo]]

Audio

To embed audio use [[embedaudio]] ... [[/embedaudio]] and the html embedding code found on the audio hosting website.

Currently supported are:

E.g.

[[embedaudio]]
<embed src="http://www.odeo.com/flash/audio_player_standard_gray.swf" 
quality="high" width="300" height="52" name="audio_player_standard_gray" 
align="middle" allowScriptAccess="always" wmode="transparent"  
type="application/x-shockwave-flash" flashvars="audio_id=99133&audio_duration=282.0&valid_sample_rate=true&external_url=http://www.vitalpodcasts.com/FileSystem/podcasts/89/opensource_episode1.mp3" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" />
</embed><br /><a style="font-size: 9px; padding-left: 110px; color: #f39; 
letter-spacing: -1px; text-decoration: none" href="http://odeo.com/audio/99133/view">
powered by <strong>ODEO</strong></a>
[[/embedaudio]]

Embedding code from other sites

Sometimes web sites (mainly social-oriented ones) allow you to paste a code block directly into other pages in order to increase your site functionality or embed some contet from the original site.

[[embed]] tag

The [[embed]] block tag allows you to do the same with your wiki pages. E.g. to display del.icio.us tag cloud as generated from http://del.icio.us/help/tagrolls simply wrap the html code:

[[embed]]
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://del.icio.us/feeds/js/tags/michal_frackowiak?icon;size=12-35;color=87ceeb-0000ff;title=my%20del.icio.us%20tags"></script>
[[/embed]]

For the list of supported services please see the page: Embedding code from other services.

Please note that if the code contains <script type="text/javascript"… i.e. just JavaScript, the content will not be fully rendered when you click preview while editing the page. It should be there however when you view the page afterwards.

[[iframe]] element

Using the iframe element one can embed content of any other web page. The syntax is

[[iframe url-source attributes]]

and it translates into HTML tags <iframe src="url-source" attributes></iframe>. The allowed attributes are: frameborder (0 or 1 allowed), align (left, right, top, bottom, middle), height (number of pixels or %), width (number of pixels or %), scrolling (yes or no), class, style

Iftags

Tags are kind of special labels for a page, manually added in by editors by clicking on the tags link at the page options buttons on bottom of a page. Every tag can be max 64 characters long, tags are "space" separated and there is no limit of tags per page. Tags are very useful to label pages and then it's easy to create Tag Cloud, which allow to find interesting pages or topics much faster.

Special tags start with an underline: they are not automatically shown in tag clouds, but they can be used as special limitations in [[iftag]] conditions. Tags can be used in ListPages Module with generic conditions ( +, - ) too.

Iftag is a special condition question. You can use it on every page to "react" on tags and set up on the particular page used .

Syntax:

[[iftags +tag1 -tag2 tag3]] ... [[/iftags]]

where the +/-"tag#" stands for the requested tag-indexes.
  • + before a tagname means - this tag must exist, (tag without a modifier works in a same way)
  • - before a tagname means - this tag must not exist.

Example:

[[iftags +science]]
This page is labeled as: science.

Click here to view more science articles >
[[/iftags]]

[[iftags +bug -fixed]]
This is a bug, but it's not fixed yet.
[[/iftags]]

Modules

Modules are independent widgets that can be placed in the pages. The general syntax is:
[[module ModuleName param1="value1" param2="value2" ...]]

To read more about modules see the modules section of the documentation.

Attached files

what you type what it means
[[file filename | custom-text]] produces a link to a file attached to this page.
custom-text changes the name of a link (custom-text will be displayed instead of the file name).
[[file /another-page/filename | custom-text]] produces a link to a file attached to another-page

The destination file must be first attached to the page — by clicking "files" and "upload file" from the options at the bottom of any page.

Users

what you type what you get comments
[[user user-name]]
e.g. [[user michal frackowiak]]
michal-frackowiak user info (no buddy icon)
[[*user user-name]]
e.g. [[*user michal frackowiak]]
michal-frackowiakmichal-frackowiak user info (with buddy icon)

Social bookmarking

It is easy to add "social bookmarking" buttons to your pages — just write [[social]] (without any parameters) and get:

BlinkListblogmarksdel.icio.usdiggFarkfeedmelinksFurlLinkaGoGoNewsVineNetvouzRedditYahooMyWebFacebook

This is equivalent to:

[[social blinkbits,blinklist,blogmarks,co.mments,connotea,del.icio.us,de.lirio.us,digg,fark,feedmelinks,furl,linkagogo,ma.gnolia,newsvine,netvouz,rawsugar,reddit,scuttle,shadows,simpy,smarking,spurl,tailrank,wists,yahoomyweb,facebook]]

You can also choose only selected services, e.g. to choose digg, furl and del.icio.us use:

[[social digg,furl,del.icio.us,facebook]]

and get: diggFurldel.icio.usFacebook

Tip: use social bookmarking! It is always a good idea to put social shortcuts under an article or inside your side bar.

Standalone buttons (page options)

Somehow it might be convenient to hide the default page options and present only selected buttons to the users. The syntax for it is:

[[button type options]]

Where the type is: edit, edit-append, edit-sections, history, print, files, tags, source (view page source), backlinks, talk (works similar as in MediaWiki/Wikipedia).

Possible attributes are:

  • text — alternative text to be displayed
  • class — CSS class of the A element
  • style — CSS style definition

For some nice "view source" and "print" buttons with icons you can use the following code:

[[>]]
[[button source style="background-image: url(http://www.wikidot.com/local--files/files/view-source.png); background-repeat: no-repeat; background-position: bottom right; padding-right: 20px; color: #444"]]
[[button print style="background-image: url(http://www.wikidot.com/local--files/files/document-print.png); background-repeat: no-repeat; background-position: bottom right; padding-right: 20px;color: #444"]]
[[/>]]

to get:

Layout elements

Tab view

To generate a tabview, i.e. a set of tabs, the following syntax can be used:

[[tabview]]
[[tab Title of Tab No. 1]]
Content of Tab No. 1.
[[/tab]]
[[tab Title of Tab No. 2]]
Content of Tab No. 2.
[[/tab]]
[[tab Title of Tab No. 3]]
Content of Tab No. 3.
[[/tab]]
[[/tabview]]

This will produce the following tabset:

Content of Tab No. 1.

Tabs will accept any content, but at the moment it is not possible to nest tabviews.

Another example of tabview can be found at our Snippets Wiki at http://snippets.wikidot.com/code:tabs.
Tags: syntax


Wikidot Api

Notice

This page is kept for historical purposes only. Please visit developer.wikidot.com for updated information about the Wikidot API and for help with using it!

THIS IS A DRAFT

We would like to introduce a new feature for Wikidot users: Wikidot API.

Basic concept

Wikidot API is a way computer programs and automated system can access and interact with Wikidot for some user. Users must "authorize" applications to use their identity by supplying them their unique key Wikidot generates for them.

Technical details

Wikidot API is technically an XML-RPC service, with endpoint being this URL:

https://www.wikidot.com/xml-rpc-api.php

You must use HTTP Basic Authorization with the following credentials:

  • user: the name of application that connects to API
  • password: the unique key of user

API key

Users that want to test API, need to have their unique key generated by Wikidot. If you want to have one, comment on this page and ask for one!

Notice

This page is kept for historical purposes only. Please visit developer.wikidot.com for updated information about the Wikidot API and for help with using it!

On using XML-RPC service

To use XML-RPC service, you need to have XML-RPC client that is usually a library for a programming language.

We will now show how to use Wikidot API with Python (installing Python is out of scope of this document).

Run Python interactive console:

$ python
Python 2.5.2 (r252:60911, Oct  5 2008, 19:29:17)
[GCC 4.3.2] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>

You need to import the XML-RPC library for Python (in most cases it is already installed with the default installation of Python):

>>> from xmlrpclib import ServerProxy

Supply the URL, user (application name) and password (your API key) and construct a server object proxy and list all methods, that API provides:

>>> s = ServerProxy('https://your-app:your-key@www.wikidot.com/xml-rpc-api.php')
>>> s.system.listMethods()

You should get a list like this:

['system.listMethods', 'system.methodHelp', 'system.methodSignature', 'system.multicall', 'site.pages', 'site.categories', 'page.get', 'page.files', 'page.save', 'user.valid', 'user.sites']

If you get an exception instead:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/lib/python2.5/xmlrpclib.py", line 1147, in __call__
    return self.__send(self.__name, args)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.5/xmlrpclib.py", line 1437, in __request
    verbose=self.__verbose
  File "/usr/lib/python2.5/xmlrpclib.py", line 1191, in request
    headers
xmlrpclib.ProtocolError: <ProtocolError: 401 Unauthorized>

… this means, that probably you supplied wrong API key.

Explore the API methods

The full method list is located in a separate document.

Each method gets a dictionary (associative array) as an only parameter. To use site.pages, just issue:

>>> s.site.pages({'site': 'my-wiki'})

{'site': 'my-wiki'} is a dictionary with one item labeled site with value "my-wiki". In Wikidot API passing this dictionary to method site.pages means that you want to get pages of wiki my-wiki.

To get only pages in category system, issue:

>>> s.site.pages({'site': 'my-wiki', 'category': 'system'})

The order of keys in array is irrelevant.

If you are an administrator of this site, you'll get the list of pages.

Each item in the resulting list is a dictionary (associative array) of different properties of pages. This is another convention. Each return value in Wikidot XML-RPC API is a dictionary or list of dictionaries. Keys should be self-explanatory.

An example result of the previous command:

>>> s.site.pages({'site': 'my-wiki', 'category': 'system'})
[{'category': 'system',
  'date_created': '2009-01-12T23:12:13+00:00',
  'date_edited': '2009-01-12T23:12:13+00:00',
  'full_name': 'system:join',
  'name': 'join',
  'parent_page': None,
  'site': 'my-site',
  'tag_array': ['some-tag', 'other-tag'],
  'tag_string': 'some-tag other-tag',
  'title': 'How to join?',
  'title_or_unix_name': 'How to join?',
  'title_shown': 'How to join?',
  'user_created': 'Some user',
  'user_edited': None},
 {'category': 'system',
  'date_created': '2009-01-12T23:12:13+00:00',
  'date_edited': '2009-01-12T23:12:13+00:00',
  'full_name': 'system:members',
  'name': 'members',
  'parent_page': None,
  'site': 'my-site',
  'tag_array': [],
  'tag_string': '',
  'title': 'Members',
  'title_or_unix_name': 'Members',
  'title_shown': 'Members',
  'user_created': 'Some user',
  'user_edited': None}]

For example, you can save the list to a variable and use a loop, to print a title and tags of each page:

>>> pages = s.site.pages({'site': 'my-wiki'})
>>> for page in pages:
>>>     print page['title'], page['tag_string']

As you see, we supply various formats for field tag. Also there are as much as three different title fields:

  • title: the title set by user
  • title_or_unix_name: the title if not empty, the unix name otherwise
  • title_shown: the title shown. This includes autonumbering pattern

At most cases these three will be the same unless the title is empty or the autonumbering of pages is enabled.

Using languages other than Python

To use the API in Ruby you need to set a configuration option on XML-RPC library to let it support the <nil/> value, that we use (that is an extension of XML-RPC).

There is a Ruby library called wikidot-api that wraps XMLRPC methods for convenience. Take a look at http://github.com/michalf/wikidot-api

Comments

To apply for testing, please comment!

Notice

This page is kept for historical purposes only. Please visit developer.wikidot.com for updated information about the Wikidot API and for help with using it!

Add a New Comment

Notice

This page is kept for historical purposes only. Please visit developer.wikidot.com for updated information about the Wikidot API and for help with using it!


Tags:
Wikidot For Beginners
This is the entry page with the essentials of wikidot.com for absolute beginners.
it is a good idea to read first this section….
Wikdot for beginners
What Is A Wiki Site?
Introduction
Terms Of Service (Legal issues)
What Is A License ?
Find A Page
Create an account
Login At Wikidot
Logout from Wikidot
Private messaging
My_Account (new!)
Profile settings
Join a Wiki
Search-engine

Backlinks:

Tags: beginner novice start


Wikidot For Beginners Print
[[include include:languages pagename=Wikidot For Beginners Print]]

This is the entry page used for printouts only (print command in top menu) with the essentials of wikidot.com for absolut beginners.
it is a good idea to read first this section….
This page contains per include the article Wikidot For Beginners and all sub-contents:

Wikidot-For-Beginners


This is the entry page with the essentials of wikidot.com for absolute beginners.
it is a good idea to read first this section….
Wikdot for beginners
What Is A Wiki Site?
Introduction
Terms Of Service (Legal issues)
What Is A License ?
Find A Page
Create an account
Login At Wikidot
Logout from Wikidot
Private messaging
My_Account (new!)
Profile settings
Join a Wiki
Search-engine

Backlinks:

what-is-a-wiki-site


According to Wikipedia, the world's largest wiki site:

A Wiki ([ˈwiː.kiː] <wee-kee> or [ˈwɪ.kiː] <wick-ey>) is a type of website that allows users to add, remove, or otherwise edit and change most content very quickly and easily.

And that is it! As a part of Wikidot.com network this site is a customizable piece of the Internet where users can edit content, upload files, communicate and collaborate.

The following article was copied from the community site:
http://community.wikidot.com/what-is-a-wiki-site

Traditional static websites often do not allow you to do much more than to read the content, contribute to a forum, email comments to the site owner or buy things.

But a wiki is different; it is a type of website that allows some or all visitors to the site to add, remove and change pages and content very quickly and easily.

Wikis Reduce E-mail. The ability of groups to collectively edit and develop documents can save hundreds of back-and-forth emails as shown in the image below:

wiki_collaboration.jpg
This wiki/email comparison image was originally produced by Manny Wilson in June 2007 for a presentation to senior leadership at the United States Central Command to demonstrate how wikis could be used to more rapidly draft contingency plans.

One advantage of a wiki over a traditional website is that the responsibility for making changes doesn't rest with just one person, it becomes a group resource and everyone has a stake in it and a contribution to make. Making changes and adding content can become quite addictive and good fun.

Where did wikis come from?

The name "Wiki" was inspired by the Hawaiian word wiki or wiki-wiki, which means "quick". The first wiki was developed in 1995 by an American, Ward Cunningham, who wanted an alternative to the word "quick" for his product that would allow quick, collaborative editing. He remembered the wiki-wiki shuttle buses that run between terminals at Honolulu International Airport and the name stuck.

Who uses wikis?

Wikis are now used extensively in education for classwork, assignments, and projects. Many community groups also use wikis to enable local residents to promote their town or village as a group without one person always having the responsibility of keeping it up to date.

In business, wikis are now used by many of the world's most innovative companies for team collaboration, co-authoring of documents (it avoids long email chains and makes collaboration much easier), knowledge management and intranets, event planning, contact with customers and for project work.

What are wikis used for?

Some uses that we have seen are shown below:

  • to co-author documents
  • to draft and maintain manuals
  • as a knowledge base
  • to develop an intranet or extranet
  • to communicate initiatives
  • to display static or dynamic information
  • to display frequently-asked-questions (FAQs)
  • to facilitate online discussions of topics
  • to gather requirements
  • to store college notes
  • to gather sources of information in one place accessible from anywhere
  • for team communication
  • to log client work
  • to log clients and contacts
  • to log bugs in software development
  • to organize and manage projects
  • to organize events
  • to publish articles
  • to publish checklists
  • to publish reference documentation
  • to record meeting notes
  • to record team or organization goals
  • to solve problems remotely
  • to track deadlines
  • to track invoices
  • for brainstorming and mindmapping
  • to create to-do lists
  • for conversation logs
  • for record-keeping
  • for diaries
  • to create research notes
  • to plan and write novels
  • …and lots more

Authors

This article was copied from the community site:
http://community.wikidot.com/what-is-a-wiki-site
and created by RobElliottRobElliott - thanks to him!

Introduction


This section contains the overview about Wikidot's network, browsers, users, roles, accounts, and sites.
All links open in an extra window.

What is Wikidot

Have a look on the explanation on http://www.wikidot.com/what-is-wiki

Typical general questions about Wikidot: http://www.wikidot.com/faq:general-questions

Browser Requirements

Here is the starting point: http://www.wikidot.com/doc:browser-requirements

Technical answers: http://www.wikidot.com/faq:technical

Users

User—their roles and permissions: http://www.wikidot.com/doc:users

User—their accounts: http://www.wikidot.com/faq:user-accounts

Sites

Site Features and Managing Sites: http://www.wikidot.com/faq:site-features

Editing pages:

An overview and some answers about Editing: http://www.wikidot.com/faq:editing-pages

terms-of-service

[[include http://www.wikidot.com/legal:terms-of-service]]

What-Is-A-License


This article is meant as a general introduction to licenses. As the specific laws will vary from place to place and given the fact that the author is not a lawyer, please do not consider this legal advice.
Thanks to hartnell for his words here, the founder of Game Design Novice - a typical Wikidot Site created from him with the free Wikidot software - it is Open Source!

What is a License?

In amateur game programming and design you hear about licenses all the time, especially when games and resources are distributed across the internet. In fact, even the text of and resources provided by Game Design Novice, are available under the terms of a license. What are these things, that we call licenses? What use are they? Do you really need one? This article will answer those questions.

Copyright

Before there can be a license, there must be copyright. Someone must own the rights to something. This is very important. Because if someone doesn't own the copyright, the material in question is public domain and therefore no license is needed.

Copyright, of course, is the legal right to control your work. Many people believe that copyright is the right to "profit" from your work. While this is certainly part of it, you can't profit from your work if you cannot control it. If anyone, anywhere, at anytime can copy your work, there is no reason for anyone to pay for it, they can just copy it.

Therefore, copyright gives you the legal right to determine who can and cannot make copies of your work.

The End User License

Whenever you buy and install software, you agree to what is commonly titled "The End User License". When you buy Adobe Photoshop or any other commercial software, you do not actually own the software. You do, however, own the CD that it came on. However, the program itself still belongs to the company who owns the copyright. The End User License gives you permission to use that software under certain conditions, assuming that you have paid for the permission to use it. The most common conditions of use under an End User License are:

  • That you only use the software on one computer. After all, that's all you've paid to get permission for.
  • That you do not make copies of it.
  • That you do not hold the company responsible for any damages the software does.

The Group License

With an End User License it is assumed that one person has paid for permission to make one copy of the software. This copy is not necessarily a back-up copy and such laws are not discussed in this article. Instead, you must realize that when you install the software, you are making a copy of it. The copy is from CD to your computer.

The Group License is an option with many software packages and helps us illustrate the "permission" aspect of licenses. A group license grants further permission for the software to be copied on more than one computer. Often the limit is based on a finite limit (say 5) of computers, or all of the computers at a location (at one school). Naturally, since you are buying more instances of permission with a Group License, it costs quite a bit more.

Copyleft

The above two sections describe how a copyright holder sells permission to people who want to use their work. The permission, and the terms for gaining that permission, are encompassed in the license. But what if someone wants to retain copyright over a work and doesn't want money for someone to use it? What if they do not even care if someone asks for permission in the traditional sense (buying a product, or a friendly email)? Enter Copyleft.

A copyleft license such as a Creative Commons license or a GNU license gives permission for someone to use a copyrighted work under simple and easy to understand conditions without the exchange of money. For example, Game Design Novice is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License. Under this license, you are allowed to use anything you see here (unless stated otherwise) for any reason as long as you follow one condition: you attribute the work to "The Game Designers of Game Design Novice" and link to the page you got it from.

In short, since money is not involved, and work is used more or less freely, Creative Commons and GNU licenses are a way for an author to get credit. In fact, if someone decides to use your work without following your conditions, there's nothing you can do about it without spending a large amount of money on lawyers. Here, in the Copyleft world, we tend to work on an honor system.

How to set and choose the license for your wiki

Go to your site manager yoursite.wikidot.com/admin:manage.
You can set different licenses for different categories of pages.

You will get a page with following content:

It is very important to clarify the copyright and ownership issues for your site. We highly recommend setting an open "copyleft" license that allows making the Content more or less free to copy, modify and use.

This is particularly important when your Site is created and edited collaboratively.

Read more about Creative Commons licenses, use a wizard to select the proper license or just visit Creative Commons.

Choose the category (typical example list here):

  • _default
  • admin
  • css
  • forum
  • nav
  • system

or set Inherit from "_default" for the others..

Choose the license:
( see list next paragraph)

Licenses supported

(copied from Site manager)

  • Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License (recommended)
  • Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License
  • Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike 2.5
  • Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives 2.5
  • GNU Free Documentation License 1.2
  • Standard copyright (not recommended)
  • Other: Custom license text: (max 300 characters ) - A few HTML tags are allowed: <a>, <img/>, <br/>, <strong>, <em>

Wikidot Terms of Service

Licences are part of Wikidot Terms of Service (TOS)
which can be read at http://www.wikidot.com/legal:terms-of-service

Conclusion

And there you have it, the bare minimum you need to know about licenses.
You will find the chosen license on a wikidot.com site as the last line at the bottom of any page! Have a look and you will find here:

"Unless stated otherwise Content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License"

ToDo

Adapt the text specifically to wiki edition …
gerdamigerdami

Find-A-Page


You have some ways to find a page in a site:

1. Search for any text

On the right top of your wikidot page you will find the search box where you can enter any text to search in the site (forum and/or pages). If the site uses a custom "theme" different to the used one in the community then you will find this "search box" perhaps on another location.

You will get a list of all pages (and/or forum threads) with such text in its content.

2. Module Pages used

If it is present you can use the menu point "List all pages" to show all pages in the site.

Or if not possible You can create ( or edit) any page to include following module-line(s):

[[module Pages preview="true" details="true" category="en" ]]

Notes:
Category="en" for the English pages of this wiki. Omitting a category is equivalent to category="_default" for the "standard" pages (there are other categories available on the site manager/permissions menu) ;
preview=true includes the first lines of the text;
details=true includes the last Editor, revision number and update date/time.

You will get some lists like this one (real time , means the list is from now, this moment !):

The ListPages module does not work recursively.

Create-An-Account

This page describes how you can create an account on Wikidot.com.

Table of Contents

1. Create account button

If you have not yet created an account on Wikidot.com you need to use the link-button create account at the right-top of your wikidot screen. Here is what it looks like:

Login_00.jpg

2. Create account

When you click on this button-link, the "Create Account" window opens. Here you will need to fill in some important details:

Create_account_02.jpg
  • a good unique user-id (your "screen name", unique inside the wikidot.com network).
  • a valid mail-adress where the system can send the acknowledgment (this email requires a response from you for security purposes).
  • a decision on which language you prefer to use (right now, the choices are English or Polish, and all 80% translated languages from the "Translate" wiki). This choice only affects the internal pages within the wikis you create.
  • a good password for security.
  • a repeat of this good password
  • and good eyes to answer a security question to protect the wikidot system from evvvvvil robots.

Finally, you klick on the "I accept the…." link button and aggree to the Terms of Service of wikidot.com.

3. Verification of Your Email-adress !

After clicking on this "Acceptance" button You will get a verification Email to your address - PLEASE WAIT for this!
In this Email is a link to click on - You make an acknowledgement to Wikidot - that YOUR Email-Adresse belongs to your User-ID.
If you do not get this email in some 5 -10 min than check

  • if your email-address is written wrong
  • if your email-box is full
  • if the mail has landed in the spam folder
  • could be the wikidot server is overloaded and needs more time - please wait or try again later.

We know from problems with hotmail addresses - if you do not get any email please mesage us!

4. my_account

Congratulations! You now have a wikidot account. Now you should see the "your account" buttons at the right-top of the wikidot screen changes to a personal account_menu:

Login_03.jpg

An important reminder:

  • Your my account menu button leads you to your personal Account settings; it is a good idea to set up those settings right off. Just follow the link!
  • The little square box to the right of your account name ("screen name") up in the right hand corner of the screen is a pull-down/"hidden" menu where you can logout from wikidot.com: Logout from Wikidot

Login-At-Wikidot


This page descibes how you can login to the overall wikidot community site. (Note that other individual wiki sites hosted on wikidot may require you to be logged in to collaborate or read. The process to login is the same, but depending on how the owner of that wiki has configured their site, you may not have permissions to do so on their wiki site.)

Table of Contents

1. Login button

You will find a login button on the top right of your browser screen:

Login_00.jpg

2. Create account

If you don't have an account on wikidot.com, you should click Create_account and follow the instructions to create an account. For this you will need:

  • a unique user id (unique inside the wikidot.com network) and
  • a valid email address where the system can send you acknowledgement emails.

3. Sign_on

Once you have created an account on wikidot.com, you can login to the overall wikidot community site. You will need to enter your email address and password:

Login_01.jpg

Notes for the checkboxes:

Sign me out… — The system make automatically a signout if you make login from another IP adress.

4. My Account

After you login, you will see your personal account menu at the top right of your screen:

Login_03.jpg

  • From here you can select my account which will take you to your personal account settings.
  • The dropdown menu (which you can access by clicking the arrow) will allow you to log out.

If this is your first login, you may want to edit your profile on my_account. This is optional.

Logout-From-Wikidot


This document explains how to logout / logoff from Wikidot.com and shows a little short-hand menu hidden at a little icon right from your "my_account" link at the top right side of the page.

If You are logged in with Your User Id You will find at the top right side (right from the page link "my_acount") a little icon (normally a little DownArrow, but in Internet Explorer 7 it is a little button);
MyAccountDownArrow_gd.jpgif You click on this icon a small pull-down menu will open with some short-hand and at the end the "logout" link:
MyAccountDownArrowExpanded_gd.jpg

If You want You can logoff / logout with this link and can leave the WIKIDOT.page.listeners ….

I for my own have not seen this little menu-icon for a long time - and made no logout therefore.. :)


Text ( and images ) derived from: http://community.wikidot.com/howto:logout-from-wikidot
text and images from gerdamigerdami

Edit-Your-Profile

**This page is outdated and replaced by en:my_account
my_account_settings-about-profil.jpg


Your profile page is what another user sees when they click on your user icon. The user profiles are stored on a separate wiki : http://profiles.wikidot.com. However, you can access and edit your profile from your Account Settings page. Here's how to do it :

1. Click on the link my account at the top of any page. This will take you to your Account Settings page.

my-account.png

2. In the left nav bar, click on the My Profile link near the bottom. This will take you to your My Profile page.

my-account-nav.png

3. Click on the Edit a page about myself link. This will take you to your User Profile page.

edit-a-page-about-myself.png

4. You can edit this page like any other wiki page. Changes to this page will be reflected on your profile. If you need to know how to edit a page, see edit-a-page.

5. Remember that your profile is user specific, not wiki specific. That means that no matter how many wikis you have, your user profile will stay the same. Try to keep your profile information generalized so matter what wiki a person is on when they look at your profile, it will make sense! Unless of course you only have one wiki and that is all you ever plan to have (not likely, because as we've said before, wikidot is addictive!).

Join-a-Wiki


Members of a wiki-site can have more rights than anonymous or registered users on wikidot. This depends on the setup of the permissions in the Site manager.

There are four ways to join a Wikidot wiki. (Note, if you start a wiki, you are already the admin of that wiki). By application, by password, by being invited, or by using the Join button. Before you can join any wikidot wiki, you first must have joined wikidot itself and have a wikidot account.

By Invitation

If you know the person who owns the wiki, they may invite you. If this happens, you will receive a notification that pops up on the next wikidot page you load. To accept the invitation, simply press the "Accept Invitation" button.

There is a link-button right from this "accept invitation" where you can refuse this invitation. I had never such an experience but technically this is possible.

This invitation is possible over e-mail too, if you have never heard from wikidot and the inviting site. Then you have to follow the link in the e-mail and (in most cases) have to create an account.

By Application

On the page "Join this site" or sometimes on the welcome page their is the posssibility to apply for admission - if the admins have allowed this. In this case you should have an account on wikidot (if you are an anonymous than the "Join this site" screen changes to the "Login/ Create an account" ) and type in a short text with your applyment for admission. Do not forget to click on the Apply-Button!

By Password

An admin can install a "general" password in the Site manager / members / policy page and allow the use of it. If you got such password (by mail or private message) you have the allowance to join the site as a member and can type this pasword here to get the entrance. Once you are a member of a site you will not need this password again to join.

Join Button

If the wiki administrator has set their site's access policy to be 'open' and has added a Join button to one of their pages, you can click this button and instantly become a member.

If you are not logged into a Wikidot account, it will even take you through the steps of creating one! :)

Tags:


Wikidot For Beginners Test

This is the entry page with the essentials of wikidot.com for absolut beginners.
it is a good idea to read first this section….

Wikdot for beginners
What Is A Wiki Site?
Introduction
Terms Of Service (Legal issues)
What Is A License ?
Find A Page
Create an account
Login At Wikidot
Logout from Wikidot
Private Messaging
Profile settings
Join a Wiki

New format with table-row-cell used:

Wikdot for beginners
The essentials of wikidot.com
for absolut beginners.

What Is A Wiki Site?
Introduction
Terms Of Service (Legal issues)
What Is A License ?
Find A Page
Create an account
Login At Wikidot
Logout from Wikidot
Private Messaging
Profile settings
Join a Wiki


Backlinks:

Tags:


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